Surveys and Time Series Design

Introduction
Survey Research
Survey research is considered a descriptive research design. Survey data are collected with questionnaires, which are completed by the participants themselves, or with interview surveys, by a trained interviewer. In either case, the data are numerical, which makes statistical analysis possible. The closed-ended questions used for survey interviews are very different from the semi-structured questions used for the in-depth interviews employed by qualitative studies, which produce large quantities of narrative data. Counseling Research: Quantitative, Qualitative, and Mixed Methods discusses the purposes and methodological considerations of survey research.
Time Series Research
Time series research involves studying one or more participants over time. A common time series design is the ABA design, in which a baseline measure of behavior is taken, an intervention is introduced, and then the intervention is removed. If the behavior returns to baseline levels, the intervention can be said to have had an effect. Time series designs can involve multiple baselines and treatments. They are often, but not always, used to study one person, which is why time series research is sometimes called single-subject research. Counseling Research: Quantitative, Qualitative, and Mixed Methods describes several time series designs and explains the importance of this research to bridging the gap between counseling research and practice. Time series designs that study one participant are also sometimes called case studies. They should not be confused with case studies used in the qualitative approach, in which the researcher “explores a real-life, contemporary bounde d system (a case) or multiple-bounded systems (cases) over time, through detailed, in-depth data collection involving multiple sources of information (for example, observations, interviews, audiovisual material, and documents and reports), and reports a case description and case themes” (Creswell, 2013, p. 97).
Reference
Creswell, J.W. (2013). Qualitative inquiry and research design: Choosing among five approaches (3rd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
Objectives
To successfully complete this learning unit, you will be expected to:
1. Analyze components of a time series research study.

Learning Activities
Study 1
Survey and Time Series Designs
Readings
Use your Counseling Research: Quantitative, Qualitative, and Mixed Methods text to read the following:
• Chapter 7, “An Overview of Survey Research,” pages 80–92.
• Chapter 8, “Time Series Designs,” pages 93–114.
Use the Library to read the following:
• Foster’s 2010 article, “A Best Kept Secret: Single-Subject Research Design in Counseling,” from Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation, volume 1, issue 2, pages 30–39.
• Lambert’s 2011 article, “Ethical and Legal Issues in Addictions Outcome Research,” from Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation, volume 2, issue 1, pages 25–36.

Discussion 1: 1 page needed with 400 words and two references.
A Time Series Design
Imagine you have a client whom you think would benefit from participating in a time series study. Provide a brief description of the study you would conduct, selecting from one of the models described on pages 104–107 of Counseling Research: Quantitative, Qualitative, and Mixed Methods. Address two relevant ethical considerations when conducting this kind of research. Conclude by explaining why time series research designs are important to the counseling profession. The suggested length for this post is 400 wor

 

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Surveys and Time Series Design

Surveys and Time Series Design

ANSWER


Introduction
Survey Research
Survey research is considered a descriptive research design. Survey data are collected with questionnaires, which are completed by the participants themselves, or with interview surveys, by a trained interviewer. In either case, the data are numerical, which makes statistical analysis possible. The closed-ended questions used for survey interviews are very different from the semi-structured questions used for the in-depth interviews employed by qualitative studies, which produce large quantities of narrative data. Counseling Research: Quantitative, Qualitative, and Mixed Methods discusses the purposes and methodological considerations of survey research.
Time Series Research

 

Surveys and Time Series Design

Time series research involves studying one or more participants over time. A common time series design is the ABA design, in which a baseline measure of behavior is taken, an intervention is introduced, and then the intervention is removed. If the behavior returns to baseline levels, the intervention can be said to have had an effect. Time series designs can involve multiple baselines and treatments. They are often, but not always, used to study one person, which is why time series research is sometimes called single-subject research. Counseling Research: Quantitative, Qualitative, and Mixed Methods describes several time series designs and explains the importance of this research to bridging the gap between counseling research and practice. Time series designs that study one participant are also sometimes called case studies. They should not be confused with case studies used in the qualitative approach, in which the researcher “explores a real-life, contemporary bounde d system (a case) or multiple-bounded systems (cases) over time, through detailed, in-depth data collection involving multiple sources of information (for example, observations, interviews, audiovisual material, and documents and reports), and reports a case description and case themes” (Creswell, 2013, p. 97).
Reference
Creswell, J.W. (2013). Qualitative inquiry and research design: Choosing among five approaches (3rd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
Objectives
To successfully complete this learning unit, you will be expected to:
1. Analyze components of a time series research study.

Learning Activities
Study 1
Survey and Time Series Designs
Readings
Use your Counseling Research: Quantitative, Qualitative, and Mixed Methods text to read the following:
• Chapter 7, “An Overview of Survey Research,” pages 80–92.
• Chapter 8, “Time Series Designs,” pages 93–114.
Use the Library to read the following:
• Foster’s 2010 article, “A Best Kept Secret: Single-Subject Research Design in Counseling,” from Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation, volume 1, issue 2, pages 30–39.
• Lambert’s 2011 article, “Ethical and Legal Issues in Addictions Outcome Research,” from Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation, volume 2, issue 1, pages 25–36.

Discussion 1: 1 page needed with 400 words and two references.
A Time Series Design
Imagine you have a client whom you think would benefit from participating in a time series study. Provide a brief description of the study you would conduct, selecting from one of the models described on pages 104–107 of Counseling Research: Quantitative, Qualitative, and Mixed Methods. Address two relevant ethical considerations when conducting this kind of research. Conclude by explaining why time series research designs are important to the counseling profession. The suggested length for this post is 400 wor