Sex and friendship don’t mix is a common wisdom: Discuss with reference to close friendships in heterosexual contexts.

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ASSESSMENTS
TITLE DESCRIPTION % DUE DATE
Participation Attend and actively participate in Tutorials 10 Ongoing
Essay 1 Choose ONE of three essay questions. Answer the
question by engaging with (a) the relevant lecture, (b) the
set weekly readings and (c) ONE additional scholarly
article or book chapter you have found.
Minimum references: 3 (lecture, set reading/s,
additional material such as a sociology journal article or
book chapter).
Word count (including references): 600
The questions will be posted on iLearn in Week 3.

20 Week 6, 4 September,
11.55pm

Essay 2 Choose ONE of three essay questions. Answer the
question by engaging with (a) the relevant lecture, (b) the
set weekly readings and (c) TWO additional scholarly
articles or book chapters you have found.
Minimum references: 4 (lecture, set reading/s,
additional material such as a sociology journal article or
book chapter).
Word count (including references): 800
The questions will be posted on iLearn in Week 6.

30 Week 9, 9 October,
11.55pm

Essay 3 Choose ONE of three essay questions. Answer the
question by engaging with (a) the relevant lecture, (b) the
set weekly readings and (c) THREE additional scholarly
article or book chapter you have found.
Minimum references: 5 (lecture, set reading/s,
additional material such as a sociology journal article or
book chapter).
Word count (including references): 1000
The questions will be posted on iLearn in Week 10.

40 Week 13, 6 November,
11.55pm

• To reference lectures, write for example: (SOC315, Lecture Week 4)
• All assignments have to be submitted via Turnitin BEFORE midnight on the due date.

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READINGS / REFERENCES
You will find the Readings as PDF files on your iLearn page under the respective weeks.
WEEK 1
1. Evans, M. 2003, ‘What is this Thing Called Love?’, Love: An Unromantic Discussion, Polity Press,
Cambridge, pp. 1-24.
WEEK 2
1. Giddens, A. 1992, ‘Romantic Love and Other Attachments’, The Transformation of Intimacy: Sexuality,
Love and Eroticism in Modern Societies’, Stanford UP, Stanford, pp. 37-47
2. Giddens, A. 1993, ‘Love, Commitment and the Pure Relationship’, The Transformation of Intimacy:
Sexuality, Love and Eroticism in Modern Societies’, Stanford UP, Stanford, pp. 48-64.
3. Giddens, A. 1993, ‘Intimacy and Democracy’, The Transformation of Intimacy: Sexuality, Love and
Eroticism in Modern Societies’, Stanford UP, Stanford, pp. 184-203.
WEEK 3
1. Illouz, E. 2007, ‘Romantic Webs’, Cold Intimacies, Polity Press, Cambridge, pp. 74-114.
2. Kearney, J. 2015, ‘Between Love and Tinder: Investigating the Erotic Friendship’, Archer Magazine,

http://archermagazine.com.au/2015/06/between-love-and-tinder-investigating-the-erotic-
friendship/

WEEK 4
1. Fromm, E. 1963, ‘Love and its Disintegration in Contemporary Western Society’ and ‘The Practice of
Love’, The Art of Loving, Bantam, New York, pp. 1-5, 65-104.
2. Illouz, E. 1996, ‘Reason within Passion’, Consuming the Romantic Utopia, University of California Press,
Berkeley, pp. 187-207.
WEEK 5
1. Bancroft, J. 2004, ‘Alfred C. Kinsey and the Politics of Sex Research’, Annual Review of Sex Research,
vol. 15, pp. 1-39.
2. Bullough, V.L. 1998, ‘Alfred Kinsey and the Kinsey Report: Historical Overview and Lasting
Contributions’, The Journal of Sex Research, vol. 35, no. 2, pp. 127-31.
WEEK 6
1. Irvine, J.M. ‘The Sociologist as Voyeur: Social Theory and Sexuality Research, 1910–1978’, Qualitative
Research, vol. 26, no. 4, pp. 429-56.
2. Tiefer, L. ‘Prognosis: More Pharmasex’, Sexualities, vol. 11, no. 12, pp. 53-9/

7

WEEK 7
1. Ahmed, S. 2004, ‘Queer Feelings’, The Cultural Politics of Emotion, Edinburgh University Press,
Edinburgh, pp. 144-67.
2. Corteen, K. 2002, ‘Lesbian Safety Talk: Problematizing Definitions and Experiences of Violence,
Sexuality and Space’, Sexualities, vol. 5, no. 3, pp. 259-80.
WEEK 8
1. Jamieson, L. 2004, ‘Intimacy, Negotiated Non-monogamy and the Limits of the Couple’, The State of
Affairs: Explorations in Fidelity and Commitment, J. Duncombe, K. Harrison, G. Allan, D. Marsden
(eds), Lawrence Erlbaum, New Jersey, pp. 35-57.
2. Haritaworn, J., Lin, C. and C. Klesse 2006, ‘Poly/logue: A Critical Introduction to Polyamory, Sexualities,
vol. 9. no. 5, pp. 515-29.
WEEK 9
1. Markus, M.R. 2010, ‘Lovers and Friends: “Radical Utopias” of Intimacy?’ Thesis Eleven 101, pp. 6-23
2. Misztal, B. 1996, ‘Trust and Friendship’, Trust and Modernity, Polity Press, Cambridge, pp. 176-91.
WEEK 10
1. Paine, R., 1969, ‘In Search of Friendship: An Exploratory Analysis in “Middle-Class” Culture’, Man, vol.
4, no. 4, pp. 505–524.
2. Blatterer, H. 2013, ‘Friendship’s Freedom and Gendered Limits’, European Journal of Social Theory, vol.
16, no. 4, pp. 435-56.
Week 11
1. Blatterer, H. 2015, ‘Gender and the Love-Friendship Paradox’, Everyday Friendships: Intimacy as
Freedom in a Complex World, Palgrave Macmillan, New York, pp. 127-46.
2. Blatterer, H. 2015, ‘The Love-Friendship Paradox and Cross-Sex Friendship’, Everyday Friendships:
Intimacy as Freedom in a Complex World, Palgrave Macmillan, New York, pp. 147-73.
WEEK 12
1. Roseneil, S., Budgeon, S., 2004, ‘Cultures of Intimacy and Care beyond “the Family”: Personal Life and
Social Change in the Early 21st Century, Current Sociology, vol. 52, pp. 135-59.
2. Gross, N., 2005, ‘The Denationalization of Intimacy Reconsidered’, Sociological Theory, vol. 23, 286–

Description

One of the most asked questions when it comes to friendships and relationships is whether a man and a woman can be friends (Blatterer, 2015:147). Although this is an awkward question to ask since there lots of people who have friends of either sex, it elicits mixed reactions in the society. This is because there are those who argue that they can have friends from the opposite sex and still enjoy sexual acts with them. On the other hand there are those who argue that sex and friendship do not mix and once a friend has sex with their friend the friendship suffers uncertainties and may collapse prematurely. This paper looks at the two schools of thought those that argue that friends can actually have sex and still have a blossoming relationship and those who argue that friends should never have sex at all costs.