NEW URBANISM AND PRINCIPLES OF NEW URBANISM

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Introduction

In the 20th century, the popular growth and use of vehicles in cities coupled with new outlooks has characterised the modern urbanisation that is based on usage zoning and their separation based on work, free time, house, and shopping. These new outlooks have been developed during the eight decades of the century (Rahnama, Roshani, Hassani & Hossienpour 2012). Several theories have been represented by a number of American urbanists regarding wear and tear as well as the decline of urban centres and increased local and suburban societies in outskirts of cities. These suburban societies are scatter and dispersed based on their distance from the urban centres and traffic. The evolution of these theories in the 1980s was caused by the appearance of new urbanism movement that was based on humanistic urbanism (Hossienpour & Shamshir 2010). This paper therefore defines and discusses new urbanism as well as principles of new urbanism with a focus on Australian urbanisation. The paper further critically discusses the proposition that the best prospects for making Australian urban settlements more sustainable lie in the principles of ‘New Urbanism’. The paper links new urbanism and economic, social, and environmental sustainability in urban cities by giving examples of new urbanist settlements. Therefore, principles of new urbanism are discussed in this paper and are linked with sustainability in urban areas.

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Description

WHAT IS NEW URBANISM AND PRINCIPLES OF NEW URBANISM? THE BEST
PROSPECTS FOR MAKING AUSTRALIAN URBAN SETTLEMENTS MORE
SUSTAINABLE LIE IN THE PRINCIPLES OF ‘NEW URBANISM’. CRITICALLY

DISCUSS THIS PROPOSITION

 

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ANSWER

 

Introduction

In the 20th century, the popular growth and use of vehicles in cities coupled with new outlooks has characterised the modern urbanisation that is based on usage zoning and their separation based on work, free time, house, and shopping. These new outlooks have been developed during the eight decades of the century (Rahnama, Roshani, Hassani & Hossienpour 2012). Several theories have been represented by a number of American urbanists regarding wear and tear as well as the decline of urban centres and increased local and suburban societies in outskirts of cities. These suburban societies are scatter and dispersed based on their distance from the urban centres and traffic. The evolution of these theories in the 1980s was caused by the appearance of new urbanism movement that was based on humanistic urbanism (Hossienpour & Shamshir 2010). This paper therefore defines and discusses new urbanism as well as principles of new urbanism with a focus on Australian urbanisation. The paper further critically discusses the proposition that the best prospects for making Australian urban settlements more sustainable lie in the principles of ‘New Urbanism’. The paper links new urbanism and economic, social, and environmental sustainability in urban cities by giving examples of new urbanist settlements. Therefore, principles of new urbanism are discussed in this paper and are linked with sustainability in urban areas.

New Urbanism

New urbanism is one of the newest approaches in urban design in American and Australian cities which gained prevalence 1980s and 1990s. This new movement is aimed at addressing the problem of wear and tear as well as the unsustain ability of suburbs of big cities. Economic activity coupled with property prices in Australian cities are very strong and high profile redevelopment activities of former industrial land has succeeded in transforming the quality of the old inner suburbs into modern urban form. Schurch (1999) defines new urbanism as an approach to urban planning and development that is based on principles of traditional design for cities such as walkable blocks and streets, accessible public spaces, and housing and shopping proximity.