Integrative Approach

Introduction
Although some counselors define one clear theoretical approach for the work they do with clients, most professionals draw from two or more theories of psychotherapy to provide effective counseling for the wide range of clients they see. Integrative psychotherapy requires counselors to have mastered the key elements within each approach they use, having a thorough understanding of how these theories view human growth and development, the process of change, the role of the counselor, and the use of specific techniques or interventions.
As you continue to develop your personal theory of counseling, you will consider which theories most reflect your personal values style as a counselor and how you can best integrate these approaches in the work you do with clients.

Objectives
To successfully complete this learning unit, you will be expected to:
1. Apply an integrative approach to a client scenario.
2. Compare psychotherapeutic theories to create an integrative approach.
3. Evaluate the appropriateness of a specific psychotherapeutic approach for diverse populations and for diverse clients.
4. Evaluate the evidence base supporting a main theory of counseling.
5. Critically evaluate the limitations of using the chosen theory with the client case.
6. Evaluate the concepts, principles, and assumptions of a major theory of counseling.
7. Incorporate evidence-based techniques and interventions from the chosen theory to a case.
8. Identify a theory that most resonates with you, establishing your personal theoretical foundation.
9. Communicate in a manner that is consistent with the expectations of a professional counselor.

Learning Activities Studies
Readings
Use your Theory and Practice of Counseling and Psychotherapy text and the library to complete the following:
• Read Chapter 15, “An Integrative Perspective,” pages 463–502.
• Review Chapter 16, “Case Illustration: An Integrative Approach to Working With Stan,” pages 503–522.
• Read Cepeda and Davenport’s 2006 article “Person-Centered Therapy and Solution-Focused Brief Therapy: An Integration of Present and Future Awareness” in Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, Practice, Training, volume 43, issue 1, pages 1–12.
• Review Tursi and Cochran’s 2006 article “Cognitive-Behavioral Tasks Accomplished in a Person-Centered Relational Framework” in the Journal of Counseling and Development, volume 84, issue 4, pages 387–396.

Optional Readings
The following articles are recommended examples of integrative approaches but not required for this unit:
• Castonguay, L. G. (2006). Personal pathways in psychotherapy integration. Journal of Psychotherapy Integration, 16(1), 36–58.
• Consoli, A. J., & Jester, C. M. (2005). A model for teaching psychotherapy theory through an integrative structure. Journal of Psychotherapy Integration, 15(4), 358–373.
• Disque, J. G., & Bitter, J. R. (1998). Integrating narrative therapy with Adlerian lifestyle assessment: A case study. Journal of Individual Psychology, 54(4), 431–450.
• Duba, D. J., Graham, M. A., Britzman, M., & Minatrea, N. (2009). Introducing the “basic needs genogram” in reality therapy-based marriage and family counseling. International Journal of Reality Therapy, 28(2), 15–19.
• LaTorre, M. A. (2007). Integrative perspectives. Perspectives in Psychiatric Care, 43(3), 151–153.
• Lazarus, A. A. (2005). Is there still a need for psychotherapy integration? Current Psychology: Developmental, Learning, Personality, Social, 24(3), 149–152.
• Tønnesvang, J., Sommer, U., Hammink, J., & Sonne, M. (2010). Gestalt therapy and cognitive therapy—Contrasts or complementarities? Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, Practice, Training, 47(4), 586–602.

Discussion 1
Integrative Approach
For this discussion, you will choose two theories you wish to integrate. For examples of how two theories can be integrated, review some of the optional articles in this unit. Then complete the following:
• First, summarize your understanding of utilizing an integrative therapeutic model.
• Summarize the key points of the two theories, identifying some of the similarities and some of the differences.
• Focus on the areas where the theories differ, describing how they would need to be adjusted in order to be integrated with each other.
• Provide specific examples of how you would use the integrative model with a client suffering from moderate depression.
You should utilize scholarly research to support your ideas. This discussion response should be a minimum of 500 words.

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Integrative Approach

Integrative Approach

ANSWER


Introduction
Although some counselors define one clear theoretical approach for the work they do with clients, most professionals draw from two or more theories of psychotherapy to provide effective counseling for the wide range of clients they see. Integrative psychotherapy requires counselors to have mastered the key elements within each approach they use, having a thorough understanding of how these theories view human growth and development, the process of change, the role of the counselor, and the use of specific techniques or interventions.
As you continue to develop your personal theory of counseling, you will consider which theories most reflect your personal values style as a counselor and how you can best integrate these approaches in the work you do with clients.

Objectives
To successfully complete this learning unit, you will be expected to:
1. Apply an integrative approach to a client scenario.
2. Compare psychotherapeutic theories to create an integrative approach.
3. Evaluate the appropriateness of a specific psychotherapeutic approach for diverse populations and for diverse clients.
4. Evaluate the evidence base supporting a main theory of counseling.
5. Critically evaluate the limitations of using the chosen theory with the client case.
6. Evaluate the concepts, principles, and assumptions of a major theory of counseling.
7. Incorporate evidence-based techniques and interventions from the chosen theory to a case.
8. Identify a theory that most resonates with you, establishing your personal theoretical foundation.
9. Communicate in a manner that is consistent with the expectations of a professional counselor.

Learning Activities Studies
Readings
Use your Theory and Practice of Counseling and Psychotherapy text and the library to complete the following:
• Read Chapter 15, “An Integrative Perspective,” pages 463–502.
• Review Chapter 16, “Case Illustration: An Integrative Approach to Working With Stan,” pages 503–522.
• Read Cepeda and Davenport’s 2006 article “Person-Centered Therapy and Solution-Focused Brief Therapy: An Integration of Present and Future Awareness” in Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, Practice, Training, volume 43, issue 1, pages 1–12.
• Review Tursi and Cochran’s 2006 article “Cognitive-Behavioral Tasks Accomplished in a Person-Centered Relational Framework” in the Journal of Counseling and Development, volume 84, issue 4, pages 387–396.

Integrative Approach

 

Optional Readings
The following articles are recommended examples of integrative approaches but not required for this unit:
• Castonguay, L. G. (2006). Personal pathways in psychotherapy integration. Journal of Psychotherapy Integration, 16(1), 36–58.
• Consoli, A. J., & Jester, C. M. (2005). A model for teaching psychotherapy theory through an integrative structure. Journal of Psychotherapy Integration, 15(4), 358–373.
• Disque, J. G., & Bitter, J. R. (1998). Integrating narrative therapy with Adlerian lifestyle assessment: A case study. Journal of Individual Psychology, 54(4), 431–450.
• Duba, D. J., Graham, M. A., Britzman, M., & Minatrea, N. (2009). Introducing the “basic needs genogram” in reality therapy-based marriage and family counseling. International Journal of Reality Therapy, 28(2), 15–19.
• LaTorre, M. A. (2007). Integrative perspectives. Perspectives in Psychiatric Care, 43(3), 151–153.
• Lazarus, A. A. (2005). Is there still a need for psychotherapy integration? Current Psychology: Developmental, Learning, Personality, Social, 24(3), 149–152.
• Tønnesvang, J., Sommer, U., Hammink, J., & Sonne, M. (2010). Gestalt therapy and cognitive therapy—Contrasts or complementarities? Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, Practice, Training, 47(4), 586–602.

Discussion 1
Integrative Approach
For this discussion, you will choose two theories you wish to integrate. For examples of how two theories can be integrated, review some of the optional articles in this unit. Then complete the following:
• First, summarize your understanding of utilizing an integrative therapeutic model.
• Summarize the key points of the two theories, identifying some of the similarities and some of the differences.
• Focus on the areas where the theories differ, describing how they would need to be adjusted in order to be integrated with each other.
• Provide specific examples of how you would use the integrative model with a client suffering from moderate depression.
You should utilize scholarly research to support your ideas. This discussion response should be a minimum of 500 words.

Thanks for getting your eTextbook from Chegg! You can access your e-textbook by signing in to Chegg.com and visiting your library.
Reading an eTextbook at Chegg has a lot of advantages and here are a few things to help get you started:
• All you need is a web browser and an internet connection to see your eTextbooks. There is no additional software to install.
• You can read books on your desktop, laptop, tablet or smartphone.
• Just like a physical textbook, you can highlight and take notes in your eTextbook.
• You can search, copy, and print eTextbook content.
Be sure to check out our eReader help section for more details. Thanks for ordering from Chegg, and we hope you have a great term!