Gender and Sexual Orientation

Introduction
This unit addresses the biological, psychological, and sociological aspects of gender, gender typing, and psychological androgyny. It also discusses the influence of nature and nurture on gender.
One of the basic concepts to be taken from this unit is that biological and environmental factors interact to make us the men and women we become. Another is that being a female or male, a woman or a man, may not be as straightforward as is often thought.
Finally, this unit clarifies how cultural and social influences interact with gender, impacting differently on females and males as they grow and develop. These basic concepts form a foundation on which other aspects of our sexuality can be viewed.
Objectives
To successfully complete this learning unit, you will be expected to:
1. Demonstrate personal awareness of attitudes, beliefs, understandings, and acculturative experiences as related to human sexuality that contribute to an understanding of self and culturally diverse clients.
2. Describe strategies for working with diverse clientele in order to address issues of human sexuality.

Learning Activities Studies
Readings
Use your Understanding Human Sexuality text to complete the following:
• Chapter 12, “Gender and Sexuality,” pages 305–326.
• Chapter 13, “Sexual Orientation: Gay, Straight, or Bi?” pages 327–353.
Use the Library to complete the following:
• Campbell’s 2013 article, “Sexual Health Needs and the LGBT Community,” from Nursing Standard, volume 27, issue 32, pages 35–38.
• Averett, Yoon, and Jenkins’s 2012 article, “Older Lesbian Sexuality: Identity, Sexual Behavior, and the Impact of Aging,” from the Journal of Sex Research, volume 49, issue 5, pages 495–507.
• Muzacz and Akinsulure-Smith’s 2013 article, “Older Adults and Sexuality: Implications for Counseling Ethnic and Sexual Minority Clients,” from the Journal of Mental Health Counseling, volume 35, issue 1, pages 1–14.
• Ross, Dobinson, and Eady’s 2010 article, “Perceived Determinants of Mental Health for Bisexual People: A Qualitative Examination,” from the American Journal of Public Health, volume 100, issue 3, pages 496–502.

Discussion 1: 1 page needed with 2 references.
Sexual Orientation: Nature versus Nurture
Is sexual orientation created by nature or nurture? Clients will present with strong beliefs in both directions. For this discussion, identify your personal beliefs regarding nature versus nurture, and discuss how you might work with clients who take strong positions that differ from your own.

Discussion 2: 1 page needed with 2 references.
Sexual Orientation: A Parent’s Concerns
A father and his 3-year-old child present to you for counseling because of the young boy’s preference for playing with dolls. The father is very upset and wants to throw away any doll that is in the house. Additionally, he has repeatedly purchased toy guns, basketballs, trucks, and blocks. To his despair, his son does not play with any of these toys but will convert the toys into pretend babies and dolls. It is not uncommon for the son to wrap up a truck or gun in a blanket and utilize baby talk with the object. The father feels like he is out of solutions regarding how to solve this problem and wants you to “fix” his son. How do you address this issue and help the father “solve the problem”?

 

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Description

Gender and Sexual Orientation

Gender and Sexual Orientation

ANSWER


Introduction
This unit addresses the biological, psychological, and sociological aspects of gender, gender typing, and psychological androgyny. It also discusses the influence of nature and nurture on gender.
One of the basic concepts to be taken from this unit is that biological and environmental factors interact to make us the men and women we become. Another is that being a female or male, a woman or a man, may not be as straightforward as is often thought.
Finally, this unit clarifies how cultural and social influences interact with gender, impacting differently on females and males as they grow and develop. These basic concepts form a foundation on which other aspects of our sexuality can be viewed.
Objectives
To successfully complete this learning unit, you will be expected to:
1. Demonstrate personal awareness of attitudes, beliefs, understandings, and acculturative experiences as related to human sexuality that contribute to an understanding of self and culturally diverse clients.
2. Describe strategies for working with diverse clientele in order to address issues of human sexuality.

Learning Activities Studies
Readings
Use your Understanding Human Sexuality text to complete the following:
• Chapter 12, “Gender and Sexuality,” pages 305–326.
• Chapter 13, “Sexual Orientation: Gay, Straight, or Bi?” pages 327–353.
Use the Library to complete the following:
• Campbell’s 2013 article, “Sexual Health Needs and the LGBT Community,” from Nursing Standard, volume 27, issue 32, pages 35–38.
• Averett, Yoon, and Jenkins’s 2012 article, “Older Lesbian Sexuality: Identity, Sexual Behavior, and the Impact of Aging,” from the Journal of Sex Research, volume 49, issue 5, pages 495–507.
• Muzacz and Akinsulure-Smith’s 2013 article, “Older Adults and Sexuality: Implications for Counseling Ethnic and Sexual Minority Clients,” from the Journal of Mental Health Counseling, volume 35, issue 1, pages 1–14.
• Ross, Dobinson, and Eady’s 2010 article, “Perceived Determinants of Mental Health for Bisexual People: A Qualitative Examination,” from the American Journal of Public Health, volume 100, issue 3, pages 496–502.

Discussion 1: 1 page needed with 2 references.
Sexual Orientation: Nature versus Nurture
Is sexual orientation created by nature or nurture? Clients will present with strong beliefs in both directions. For this discussion, identify your personal beliefs regarding nature versus nurture, and discuss how you might work with clients who take strong positions that differ from your own.

Discussion 2: 1 page needed with 2 references.
Sexual Orientation: A Parent’s Concerns
A father and his 3-year-old child present to you for counseling because of the young boy’s preference for playing with dolls. The father is very upset and wants to throw away any doll that is in the house. Additionally, he has repeatedly purchased toy guns, basketballs, trucks, and blocks. To his despair, his son does not play with any of these toys but will convert the toys into pretend babies and dolls. It is not uncommon for the son to wrap up a truck or gun in a blanket and utilize baby talk with the object. The father feels like he is out of solutions regarding how to solve this problem and wants you to “fix” his son. How do you address this issue and help the father “solve the problem”?