Energy: How Work Gets Done.

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Unit 4 Project: Energy: How Work Gets Done. Real Science
Dangerous and Natural Energy
Just because something is natural does not mean it is not dangerous. Take the earth’s energy as an example. Every year, hundreds and sometimes thousands of people are killed because of earthquakes and other seismic events that destroy homes, buildings, cities, and roads.
Begin this project by reading about earthquakes here:
1. http://earthquake.usgs.gov/learning/kids/eqscience.php
2. http://earthquake.usgs.gov/learning/facts.php
For this project, you will use the United States Geological Survey (USGS) tools to help determine if you are in danger, based upon where you live. Visit the USGS interactive map: http://gldims.cr.usgs.gov/nshmp2008/viewer.htm This displays the regions of the United States that are most likely to experience a significant earthquake in the next fifty years. The scale moves from white (almost zero risk) to red (very high risk).
1. What patterns to you see in the distribution of earthquakes across the continental United States?
2. Locate your home on this map and make a note of the relative risk to you by indicating the color where you live.
The USGS also reports on earthquakes around the world. Visit this interactive map to find the latest global earthquake data from the past seven days: http://earthquake.usgs.gov/eqcenter/recenteqsww/
3. What patterns do you see in the distribution of earthquakes around the world?
4. Click on one of the earthquakes on the map and make a note of its magnitude and region.
5. Would you be willing to live in one of the red areas on the map? Explain.
6. If you and your family were forced to relocate to a red area, how could you use the USGS resources on earthquake readiness (http://earthquake.usgs.gov/learning/faq.php?categoryID=14) to help your family prepare themselves?
7. Examine the list of the most destructive earthquakes on record: http://earthquake.usgs.gov/regional/world/most_destructive.php What are the two most recent earthquakes on this list? What does this list tell you about the power of science to control or predict earthquakes?
8. Even though science cannot predict or prevent earthquakes, what seismological tools do we have to sense the planet’s rumblings? What events do you think might have encouraged the development of these tools?
9. How is this kind of geological energy different from biological energy (such as the calories creatures get when they consume food)? How are they the same?
Basic Writing Expectations:
1. Minimum word count: 750 words, not including title page, references, or quotations.
2. Include a title page, double space, and font size 10 or 12
3. Include a highly developed viewpoint/thesis, purpose and exceptional content
4. Demonstrate superior organization: use logic
5. Free of grammar and spelling errors
6. No evidence of plagiarism
7. Use the APA style for all citations
Instructor Name and Credentials: Trena Woolridge.
Textbook Information
Title: Real Science
Authors: Benford, Gregory, Michael R. Rose, David Krogh, Edward J. Tarbuck, and Frederick K. Lutgens
ISBN: 0-558-12371 and 0-558-12717-7
Publisher: Pearson Publishing

Description

Energy: How Work Gets Done.

Energy: How Work Gets Done.

ANSWER


Earthquakes are common phenomenon in the world. They usually happen when two earth blocks slips over the other on a fault or fault plane.  Earthquakes are caused movement of different tectonic plates that slip over the other (Gregory et al., 2000). The largest earthquake to have been recorded in the world was in Chile on May 22, 1960, measuring 9.5 Mw while the earliest reported earthquake was in California in 1769.

The probability or risk for earthquake is distributed in different areas in the world. There are areas which are prone to earthquake while others are not prone to earthquakes.  From the graph on distribution of probability of earthquake in the next fifty years, it is evident that the red areas (increased probability of earthquake) are distributed towards the end of plate tectonics while white (almost zero probability for earthquake) are distributed inland and some at the plate end.  The pattern shows that the risk of earthquake is distributed on one region more than others. The east side of the country shows increased risk of earthquake compared to other areas of United States.