Discussion 2: Role of Choice in Addiction

$6.00

Introduction
The history of addiction treatment in the United States has been
shaped by how the country responded to the prevalence of heavy alcohol
use in the colonial period (Stolberg, 2006) through modern challenges
related to the range of substances of abuse and expansions of what is
considered an addiction (Karim & Chaudhri, 2012). The history of
treatment is complicated by how we define addiction. For the purposes
of this course, addiction will be limited to the disorders defined in
the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental
Disorders (or DSM-5) published by the American Psychiatric
Association. While this excludes many behavioral addictions as
outlined by Karim and Chaudhri (2012), it does offer a common frame of
reference that is relevant for the practicing counseling professional.
The models of addiction that will be introduced in this unit and
explored in more detail in Unit 2 reflect the tension between
understanding addiction as a moral failing or a choice (Heyman, 2013)
and conceptualizing addiction as a disease (Miller, 1993). Variations
on each side of that dichotomy are explored in our readings, and the
underlying assumptions for both polarizing viewpoints are challenged.
Exploring the relative strengths and limitations of adopting either
side of the debate will help set the stage for how treatment
approaches are evaluated throughout the course.

References
American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Substance-related and
addictive disorders. In Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental
disorders (5th ed.) (pp. 481–490). Arlington, VA: Author.
Heyman, G. M. (2013). Addiction and choice: Theory and new data.
Frontiers in Psychiatry, 4(31), 1–5.
Karim, R., & Chaudhri, P. (2012). Behavioral addictions: An overview.
Journal of Psychoactive Drugs, 44(1), 5–17.
Miller, W. R. (1993). Alcoholism: Toward a better disease model.
Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, 7(2), 129–136.
Stolberg, V. B. (2006). A review of perspectives on alcohol and
alcoholism in the history of American health and medicine. Journal of
Ethnicity in Substance Abuse, 5(4) 39–106.
Objectives
To successfully complete this learning unit, you will be expected to:
1. Analyze theories of addiction.
2. Compare historical addictions models to current evidence-based
approaches.
Learning Activities
Unit 1 Studies
Readings
Use your Substance Abuse and Addiction Treatment text to read the
following:
• Chapter 1, “Introduction,” pages 1–13.
Use the Library to read the following:
• Heyman’s 2013 article “Addiction and Choice: Theory and New Data”
in Frontiers in Psychiatry, volume 4, issue 31, pages 1–5.
• Miller’s 1993 article “Alcoholism: Toward a Better Disease Model”
in Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, volume 7, issue 2, pages
129–136.
• Pichot’s 2001 article “Co-creating Solutions for Substance Abuse”
in the Journal of Systemic Therapies, volume 20, issue 2, pages
1–23.
• Steenbergh, Runyan, Daugherty, and Winger’s 2012 article
“Neuroscience Exposure and Perceptions of Client Responsibility Among
Addictions Counselors” in the Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment,
volume 42, issue 4, pages 421–428.
• White’s 2002 article “Addiction Treatment in the United States:
Early Pioneers and Institutions” in Addiction, volume 97, issue 9,
pages 1087–1092.
Addictions Timeline
Timeline
Introduction
The following events are provided on a timeline to give learners a
sense of issues related to addiction from a historical perspective.
Learners are encouraged to seek more information on events noted that
are unfamiliar to them.
1850s
Opium use in the U.S. increased as there was an influx of new
immigrants from Asia.
1889-1914
Heroin was seen as the best medicine for pneumonia and tuberculosis.
Initially it was a legal drug, seen as helpful for pain and as a way
to avoid direct use of opium.
1914
Harrison Narcotics Act established a means of taxing persons who
compounded, dealt, dispensed, distributed, gave away, imported, or
produced opium and cocaine or their derivatives.
1921
A Narcotics Division was formed within the Bureau of Internal Revenue;
and this would eventually develop into the Drug Enforcement
Administration (DEA). The history of this division, how it came to be,
and how it developed over time is available as part of DEA history.
1925-1929
Linder Case 1925 provided a challenge for physicians prescribing drugs
to those who were addicted. Following this, there was a shift to
trying to cure addiction through treatment, such as in Federal
Hospitals in Lexington and Fort Worth for narcotics addiction.
1929
The Committee on Problems of Drug Dependence was formed to focus on
problems related to drug abuse and dependence. The organization is now
known as The College on Problems of Drug Dependence and remains one of
the longest standing groups in the United States addressing these
problems.
1938
Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act: The FDA was given control over drug
safety, and established a class of drugs available by perscription.
1954
American Society of Addiction Medicine was founded. ASAM also
maintains several resources on its rich history.
1960s-1970s
Drug law and criminalization are seen as the method to stem the rise
of the modern drug culture. Increase in popular outcry by the public
about drug using youth. Increasing goverment action to develop laws in
this area.
1966
Narcotic Addict Rehabilitation Act (NARA) allows treatment as an
alternative to jail.
1967
APA formally established a division devoted to psychological
professionals working in the area of psychopharmacology and substance
abuse, Division 28.
1970
During the administration of President Richard M. Nixon, the National
Institue on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism was established following
Congress’ passing of the Comprehensive Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
Prevention, Treatment, and Rehabilitation Act of 1970, also known as
the Hughes Act. This legislation recognized these conditions as public
health problems and conferred upon NIAAA the duty to address them.
NIAAA has documented its course and history. Additionally the history
of NIAAA is described in the National Institutes of Health (NIH)
Almanac.
1972
Drug Abuse Office and Treatment Act was established to federally fund
programs for prevention and treatment of drug problems.
1973
Methadone Control Act was established to regulate methadone licensing
as there was heightened concern around the use of methadone to treat
opiate addiction.
1973
Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Administration (ADAMHA) was
created to consolidate NIMH, NIDA, and NIAAA under umbrella
organization.
1973
A link between smoking and increased risk of infant and fetal
abnormalities was announced by the U.S. Public Health Service in
January.
1973
All diet pills containing amphetamines were recalled by the FDA in
April.
1973
In July, President Richard Nixon used an executive order to establish
the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) with the goal of creating a
single command to address drug problems. Visit the DEA resources to
learn more. Genealogy of the DEA in terms of how it emerged from other
agencies over a period of 58 years.
1974
The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) was established under the
Department of Health and Human Services to be a leading organization
in the area of drug abuse and addiction. NIDA currently publishes its
own milestones. It is also listed with a full history, listing of
events, and legislative chronology in the National Institues of Health
(NIH) Almanac.
1974
Drug Abuse Treatment and Control Amendments extended the 1972 act.
1975
Society of Psychologists in Substance Abuse was formed among American
Psychological Association members. This group eventually became
Division 50 of APA.
1976
The Research Society on Alcoholism was established as an organization
to support scientists from diverse disciplines with an interest in
addressing alcohol problems.
1978
Drug Abuse Treatment and Control Amendments extended the 1972 act.
1984
The Sentencing Reform Act had far reaching consequences, one of which
led to criminal offenders involved with drugs getting put into special
programs exclusively for these individuals.
1986
Amendment to the Controlled Substances Act to address analogue drugs,
also known as designer drugs. This act helped to make these drugs fall
under the same controls as drugs with similar effects and chemical
structure.
1989
Establishment of the first structured drug court in Dade County
Florida. For more information on drug courts, see course resources.
1992
The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration was
formed. ADAMHA Reorganization; Transfered NIDA, NIMH, and NIAAA to NIH
and incorporated ADAMHA’s programs into SAMHSA.
1993
The APA formally established a division devoted to psychologists
working in the area of addictions, Division 50.
1996
APA College of Professional Psychology awarded its first certificates
for a proficiency for psychologists in the Psychological Treatment of
Alcohol and Other Psychoactive Substance Use Disorders.
1996
The Mental Health Parity Act was passed by Congress requiring equal
coverage for physical and mental health problems. Unfortunately this
legislation had loopholes in it that prevented it from having the
desired effects.
2000
APA supports office-based treatment of heroin addiction.
2007
The National Quality Forum established the first set of voluntary
national standards for the treatment of substance use conditions.
2008
– The Paul Wellstone and Pete Domenici Mental Health Parity and
Addiction Equity Act of 2008 was passed. This legislation addressed
loopholes in the 1996 Mental Health Parity Law and brought addiction
more clearly into the conditions covered.
Additional Resources
1914
Harrison Narcotics Tax Act, 1914
1921
Records of the Drug Enforcement Administration [DEA]
1925-1929
FindLaw: Linder vs United States
1929
College on Problems of Drug Dependence
1938
Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FD&C Act)
1966
Narcotic Addict Rehabilitation Act (Nara) (Encyclopedia of Drugs,
Alcohol, and Addictive Behavior)
1967
Division 28
1970
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
1972
Richard Nixon: Statement About the Drug Abuse office and Treatment Act
of 1972
1973
Federal Regulation of Methadone Treatment
Illegal Drugs in America: A Modern History
1974
About NIDA
National Institute on Drug Abuse
1975
Division 50: History
1976
Research Society on Alcoholism (RSoA)/
1993
Division 50: History
1996
Health Insurance Reform for Consumers
2000
APA Supports Passage of Legislation for Office-Based Treatment of
Heroin Addiction
2008
Mental Health Parity is Now Law
Bill Summary & Status: 110th Congress
Optional Reading
You may choose to read the following optional library article:
White, W. L. (2004). Addiction recovery mutual aid groups: An enduring
international phenomenon. Addiction, 99(5), 532–538.

Discussion 1: 1 page needed with minimum of 250 words and 2
references.
Exploring Historical Views of Addiction
A moral model of addiction that frames an individual indulging in the
behavior or substance as morally weak would appear to be in conflict
with a disease model that suggests that the individual is a victim of
forces beyond their control. Review Miller (1993) and analyze how the
disease concept both supports and refutes a moral model of addiction
as both models have evolved over time.
Reference
Miller, W. R. (1993). Alcoholism: Toward a better disease model.
Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, 7(2), 129–136.

Discussion 2: 1 page needed with minimum of 250 words and 2
references.
Role of Choice in Addiction
Use scholarly literature to support a position on the role of choice
in addiction. Use the assigned articles in this unit for support and
consider exploring the library for additional articles that support
either a traditional disease or medical model or a contrasting view
that emphasizes the role of choice for someone to use and eventually
abstain or change.

Description

The role of choice in addiction is a controversial subject.  On one hand, there are those who ascribe to the moral model of addiction who believes that addiction is a result personal choice (Heyman, 2013). On the other hand, there are those who ascribe to the medical model of addition who believes that individuals do not have a choice in addiction because it results from genetic factors that are beyond individual control.  For those who ascribe to the moral model, they argue that normal choices process is the basis of the drug abuse. They argue that while people do not choose to be addicts, they make important choices that lead to addiction.  People tend to different on the way they frame the sequence of choices and this explains the reasons why some people are addicts while others are not.