Application of Personality Theory

Introduction
Throughout this course, you have applied different personality theories to the clinical construct of self-esteem. By doing so, you have stretched your skills to illustrate, solve, relate, and discover. The development and practice of such skills is essential in your evolution as a counselor because your ability to conceptualize theory with actual practice is an expectation in the field. As noted by Grenello (2000), “as counselors become more expert, they are able to engage in case conceptualization, integrate information, and understand interpersonal communication better than they were able at initial stages of development” (p. 31).
In this unit, you will select one of two case studies for your discussion. As you examine and discuss your selected case, be sure to reference a particular personality theory or theories. Your choice of theory may relate to what makes most sense to you or what you feel is your current theoretical orientation. Be sure to also reflect on the factors that contribute to the expression of personality—the social, cultural, biological, and lifespan perspectives.

Reference
Grenello, D. H. (2000). Encouraging the cognitive development of supervisees: Using Bloom’s taxonomy in supervision. Counselor Education & Supervision, 40(1), 31–47.

Objectives
To successfully complete this learning unit, you will be expected to:
1. Assess the expression, development, and lifespan changes of personality in a case study.
2. Analyze the internal and external factors that affect personality in the case study.
3. Submit Section 2 of the course project.

Learning Activities Studies
For this week’s discussion participation, follow these steps:
• If you select John’s Case Study, read the following library articles before you participate in the discussion:
o Presnell, Pells, Stout, and Musante’s 2008 article, “Sex Differences in the Relation of Weight Loss Self-efficacy, Binge Eating, and Depressive Symptoms to Weight Loss Success in a Residential Obesity Treatment Program,” from Eating Behaviors, volume 9, issue 2, pages 170–180.
o Heard, Whitfield, Edwards, Bruce, and Beech’s 2011 article, “Mediating Effects of Social Support on the Relationship Among Perceived Stress, Depression, and Hypertension in African Americans,” from Journal of the National Medical Association, volume 103, issue 2, pages 116–122.
o Resnick’s 2012 article, “Lifestyle Modification Slows Functional Decline in Type 2 Diabetes,” from Diabetes, volume 61, issue 9, page 2395.
• If you select Jillian’s Case Study, read the following library articles before you participate in the discussion:
o Meyer, Blissett, Alberry, and Sykes’s 2013 article, “Beliefs About Exercise: Relationship to Eating Psychopathology and Core Beliefs Among Young Female Exercisers from Eating Behaviors, volume 14, issue 1, pages 79–82.
o Vinkers, Evers, Adriaanse, and de Ridder’s 2012 article, “Body Esteem and Eating Disorder Symptomatology: The Mediating Role of Appearance-motivated Exercise in a Non-clinical Adult Female Sample, from Eating Behaviors, volume 13, issue 3, pages 214–218.
o Gregorowski, Seedat, and Jordaan’s 2013 article, “A Clinical Approach to the Assessment and Management of Co-morbid Eating Disorders and Substance Use Disorders,” from BMC Psychiatry, volume 13, issue 1, pages 289–289.

Discussion 1: 1 page needed with 2 or 3 references.
John’s and Jillian’s Case Studies
For this discussion, review John’s and Jillian’s case studies and follow these steps:
• Choose John’s or Jillian’s case study.
• Ensure you have read the articles listed in this unit’s Studies activity related to your chosen case study.
• Based on your chosen case study, answer the following questions in your initial post:
o If this were your client, what else would you like to know about the client?
o Based on the articles you read, what might explain aspects of this client’s personality in relationship to health status and lifestyle decisions?

John’s and Jillian’s Case Studies Below for your view:
John and Jill Case Study

John
John is a 51-year-old African-American man with Type 2 diabetes, diagnosed 4 years ago. John weighs 270 pounds and is 5 feet 10 inches tall. John has also been diagnosed with hypertension. John’s physician tells him that if he does not lose weight, he will likely develop a severe case of cardiovascular disease. He has struggled with managing his lifestyle—most notably his diet and exercise—all of his life. After John became insulin dependent, he became very depressed and gained an additional 30 pounds.

Jill
Jill is a 32-year-old single, Caucasian woman who works as an Associate Editor for a book publisher in New York City. She weighs 112 pounds and she is 5 feet 5 inches tall. She frequents the New York City club scene and tends to overindulge in alcohol, especially on the weekends. She attributes this overindulgence to the heavy demands of her job. Jill also attributes not having time to eat to her busy work schedule. However, Jill finds plenty of time to exercise. She participates in some type of aerobic exercise 6 days a week, often for 2 hours at a time.

 

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Application of Personality Theory’

Application of Personality Theory

ANSWER


Introduction
Throughout this course, you have applied different personality theories to the clinical construct of self-esteem. By doing so, you have stretched your skills to illustrate, solve, relate, and discover. The development and practice of such skills is essential in your evolution as a counselor because your ability to conceptualize theory with actual practice is an expectation in the field. As noted by Grenello (2000), “as counselors become more expert, they are able to engage in case conceptualization, integrate information, and understand interpersonal communication better than they were able at initial stages of development” (p. 31).
In this unit, you will select one of two case studies for your discussion. As you examine and discuss your selected case, be sure to reference a particular personality theory or theories. Your choice of theory may relate to what makes most sense to you or what you feel is your current theoretical orientation. Be sure to also reflect on the factors that contribute to the expression of personality—the social, cultural, biological, and lifespan perspectives.

 

Reference
Grenello, D. H. (2000). Encouraging the cognitive development of supervisees: Using Bloom’s taxonomy in supervision. Counselor Education & Supervision, 40(1), 31–47.

Objectives
To successfully complete this learning unit, you will be expected to:
1. Assess the expression, development, and lifespan changes of personality in a case study.
2. Analyze the internal and external factors that affect personality in the case study.
3. Submit Section 2 of the course project.

Learning Activities Studies
For this week’s discussion participation, follow these steps:
• If you select John’s Case Study, read the following library articles before you participate in the discussion:
o Presnell, Pells, Stout, and Musante’s 2008 article, “Sex Differences in the Relation of Weight Loss Self-efficacy, Binge Eating, and Depressive Symptoms to Weight Loss Success in a Residential Obesity Treatment Program,” from Eating Behaviors, volume 9, issue 2, pages 170–180.
o Heard, Whitfield, Edwards, Bruce, and Beech’s 2011 article, “Mediating Effects of Social Support on the Relationship Among Perceived Stress, Depression, and Hypertension in African Americans,” from Journal of the National Medical Association, volume 103, issue 2, pages 116–122.
o Resnick’s 2012 article, “Lifestyle Modification Slows Functional Decline in Type 2 Diabetes,” from Diabetes, volume 61, issue 9, page 2395.
• If you select Jillian’s Case Study, read the following library articles before you participate in the discussion:
o Meyer, Blissett, Alberry, and Sykes’s 2013 article, “Beliefs About Exercise: Relationship to Eating Psychopathology and Core Beliefs Among Young Female Exercisers from Eating Behaviors, volume 14, issue 1, pages 79–82.
o Vinkers, Evers, Adriaanse, and de Ridder’s 2012 article, “Body Esteem and Eating Disorder Symptomatology: The Mediating Role of Appearance-motivated Exercise in a Non-clinical Adult Female Sample, from Eating Behaviors, volume 13, issue 3, pages 214–218.
o Gregorowski, Seedat, and Jordaan’s 2013 article, “A Clinical Approach to the Assessment and Management of Co-morbid Eating Disorders and Substance Use Disorders,” from BMC Psychiatry, volume 13, issue 1, pages 289–289.

Application of Personality Theory’

Discussion 1: 1 page needed with 2 or 3 references.
John’s and Jillian’s Case Studies
For this discussion, review John’s and Jillian’s case studies and follow these steps:
• Choose John’s or Jillian’s case study.
• Ensure you have read the articles listed in this unit’s Studies activity related to your chosen case study.
• Based on your chosen case study, answer the following questions in your initial post:
o If this were your client, what else would you like to know about the client?
o Based on the articles you read, what might explain aspects of this client’s personality in relationship to health status and lifestyle decisions?

John’s and Jillian’s Case Studies Below for your view:
John and Jill Case Study

John
John is a 51-year-old African-American man with Type 2 diabetes, diagnosed 4 years ago. John weighs 270 pounds and is 5 feet 10 inches tall. John has also been diagnosed with hypertension. John’s physician tells him that if he does not lose weight, he will likely develop a severe case of cardiovascular disease. He has struggled with managing his lifestyle—most notably his diet and exercise—all of his life. After John became insulin dependent, he became very depressed and gained an additional 30 pounds.

Jill
Jill is a 32-year-old single, Caucasian woman who works as an Associate Editor for a book publisher in New York City. She weighs 112 pounds and she is 5 feet 5 inches tall. She frequents the New York City club scene and tends to overindulge in alcohol, especially on the weekends. She attributes this overindulgence to the heavy demands of her job. Jill also attributes not having time to eat to her busy work schedule. However, Jill finds plenty of time to exercise. She participates in some type of aerobic exercise 6 days a week, often for 2 hours at a time.