Mid-Term Questions – Compare and Contrast


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Compare and Contrast

1) Hubris

Mid-Term Questions – Compare and Contrast.The plays ‘A Doll’s House’ by Henrik Ibsen and ‘Tartuffe’ by Moliere have been found to compare and contrast in various ways in terms of usage of hubris in their development. Various characters in both the films have been found to compare in the way they emerged as victims of circumstances against their wish and expectations. For instance, in ‘A Doll’s House’, Nora’s initial act of forgery seemed easy for her, not knowing the upcoming predicaments associated with such an act (Pavlovski 316). In fact, it is her forgery act that seems to destruct her family and her entire future remains to be full of obstacles as a result of the act she did some years back. Mid-Term Questions – Compare and Contrast.

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To make this play a tragedy, Orgon should be exposed to a lot of stress since he is of upper-class.

Mid-Term Questions – Compare and Contrast. It is important to note that, tragedies tend to inflict some pain, hence stress, to people in the upper class and the noble ones. In this regard, all the pains underwent by Tartuffe should be restructured and leave all miseries to Orgon alone so that this play can be converted into a tragedy.  More so, super-humanity should be shown out in this play in order to make it posses the qualities of a tragedy, since all the actors at its situation seem normal and down-to-earth. Mid-Term Questions – Compare and Contrast.

Works Cited

Aponte, Mimi. Seven Generation: An Anthology of Native American Plays. Boston: Theatre          Communications Group, 1998.  Print

McMichael, George and Marx, Leo. Concise Anthology of American Literature. Washington,        DC: Prentice Hall Publishers. Print

Pavlovski, Linda. Introduction to Drama Criticism. New York: Gale Group, Inc., 2001. Print