History of U.S diplomacy

History of U.S diplomacy.

American foreign policy during World War II and the early Cold War cannot be understood without analyzing American policy between 1901 and 1919. Three of the America president serving during this time, Theodore Roosevelt (1901-1909), William Howard Taft (1909-1913), and Woodrow Wilson (1913-1921) introduced policies that continued to influence the American foreign policy in Second World War and in the cold war eras. 

Theodore Roosevelt “big stick” diplomacy, Taft’s “dollar diplomacy” and Woodrow Wilson’s “moral diplomacy” had an impact in U.S foreign policy during the World War II and cold war era. History of U.S diplomacy. While Roosevelt believed in speaking softly and carrying a big stick, his successor, Howard Taft, believed in replacing the bullet with the dollar. Wilson repudiated the dollar diplomacy, and instead believed that by promoting democracy and exerting economic pressure, American investment in Latin America and elsewhere in the world will be achieved. This essay assesses how this different world views influenced American foreign policy in World War II and cold war era with a specific focus to reign of Franklin Roosevelt and Harry S. Truman. History of U.S diplomacy.

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Overall, the foreign policy of early 1900s continued to influence the policies of the Second World War and cold war eras. The big stick diplomacy influenced the funding of the anti-Communist Contra guerrillas in Nicaragua and the deployment of the United States military in the Caribbean sphere of influence. History of U.S diplomacy. The dollar diplomacy inform the United States continued foreign assistant and in particular the Marshall Plan. In fact most people keep on calling for a Marshall Plan for war ravaged nations such as Iraq and Afghanistan. In addition, United States has continued to champion democratic ideals as advocated by Woodrow Wilson in common believe that democracies rarely go to war.

Work cited

Adams, Francis. Dollar diplomacy: United States economic assistance to Latin America. New York: Ashgate. 2000. Print.

Beck, Michael. Big stick diplomacy: the politics of the Panama Canal. Boston: University of Houston Clear Lake. 1997. Print.

Gardner, Lloyd. “American Foreign Policy 1900–1921: A Second Look at the Realist Critique of American Diplomacy.” In Barton J. Bernstein, ed. Towards a New Past: Dissenting Essays in American History. New York, M.E Sharpe. 1968. Print. History of U.S diplomacy.

Hogan, Michael. The Marshall Plan: America, Britain, and the reconstruction of Western Europe, 1947-1952. London: Cambridge university press. 1989. Print.

Howard, Thomas & Pederson, William. Franklin D. Roosevelt and the Formation of the Modern World. New York: M.E Sharpe. 2003. Print. History of U.S diplomacy.

Kaufman Joyce. A Concise History of U.S. Foreign Polic.y Boston: Rowman & Littlefield. 2009. Print.

Nolan, Cathal. Ethics and statecraft: the moral dimension of international affairs. San Francisco: Greenwood Publishing. 2004. Print. History of U.S diplomacy.

Paterson, Thomas. Major problems in American foreign policy: documents and essays. Since 1914, Volume 2. Washington, DC. Heath. 1984. Print.

Pierce, Anne. Woodrow Wilson and Harry Truman: Mission and Power in American Foreign Policy. New York. Transaction Publishers: 2007. Print. History of U.S diplomacy.


[1]Michael Beck, Big stick diplomacy: the politics of the Panama Canal. Boston: University of Houston Clear Lake. 1997. Print. 24

[2] Cathal Nolan, Ethics and statecraft: the moral dimension of international affairs. San Francisco: Greenwood Publishing. 2004. Print. 103 History of U.S diplomacy.

[3] Thomas Paterson. Major problems in American foreign policy: documents and essays. Since 1914, Volume 2. Washington, DC. Heath. 1984. Print. 457

[4] Michael Beck, Big stick diplomacy: the politics of the Panama Canal. Boston: University of Houston Clear Lake. 1997. Print. 35 History of U.S diplomacy.

[5] Lloyd Gardner. “American Foreign Policy 1900–1921: A Second Look at the Realist Critique of American Diplomacy.” In Barton J. Bernstein, ed. Towards a New Past: Dissenting Essays in American History. New York, M.E Sharpe. 1968. Print. 86 History of U.S diplomacy.

[6] Michael Hogan. The Marshall Plan: America, Britain, and the reconstruction of Western Europe, 1947-1952. London: Cambridge university press. 1989. Print. 104

[7] Francis Adams. Dollar diplomacy: United States economic assistance to Latin America. New York: Ashgate. 2000. Print. 65

[8] Ibid 78 History of U.S diplomacy.

[9] [9] Lloyd Gardner. “American Foreign Policy 1900–1921: A Second Look at the Realist Critique of American Diplomacy.” In Barton J. Bernstein, ed. Towards a New Past: Dissenting Essays in American History. New York, M.E Sharpe. 1968. Print. 108

[10] Anne Pierce, Woodrow Wilson and Harry Truman: Mission and Power in American Foreign Policy. New York. 10

[11] Joyce Kaufman. A Concise History of U.S. Foreign Policy Boston: Rowman & Littlefield. 2009. Print.84

[12] Hogan, Michael. The Marshall Plan: America, Britain, and the reconstruction of Western Europe, 1947-1952. London: Cambridge university press. 1989. Print. 46