Gilgamesh

Gilgamesh – What are Gilgamesh’s character traits, strengths and weaknesses?

There are one discussion and 10 study questions for one assignment which you’ll have to read the pages on "Gilgamesh" and for the second assignment, it’s the same thing just read "job" for the second discussion and study questions. Everything is pretty much explained on the attachments. The professor didn’t specifically say a word count, but this is the instructions he left. "Each answer should be several complete, well thought out paragraphs. For each answer, you must include textual evidence in the form of quotes and/or paraphrases, correctly cited with page numbers from your textbook."

Gilgamesh

 

Discussion 1:

 

For these discussions, you must first post your own response to the prompt. Your responses must be complete, well thought out paragraphs. Use textual evidence (quotes from the text, with page numbers) to support your points. Then, you will be able to view the responses of your classmates. You must respond to at least two other individual’s posts to receive full credit.

Engage in the discussion. Feel free to ask questions, make comparisons to other texts you have read, agree or disagree with others’ points (always be civil), and flesh out ideas.

 

Prompt:

What kind of messages do we get from the tale about death, man’s mortality, and harsh reality? How does Gilgamesh’s reaction to the death of Enkidu inform this? How do Utnapishtim and the flood play into this?

 

Study questions 1:

 

Open a Microsoft Word document and answer the following questions. Each answer should be several complete, well thought out paragraphs. For each answer, you must include textual evidence in the form of quotes and/or paraphrases, correctly cited with page numbers from your textbook.

 

  • What are Gilgamesh’s character traits, strengths and weaknesses?   What are Enkidu’s?

 

  • What is the relationship between the wild and the civilized?

 

  • Why is sex considered a civilizing force?

 

  • What is the relationship between mankind and nature?   How does the killing of Humbaba play into this?

 

  • What are the female characters like? How much power do they have?

 

  • What elements inspire the tight male bonding?

 

  • How does the story of Utnapishtim compare with the story of Noah’s Ark?

 

  • What is the significance of the sleep test Utnapishtim asks Gilgamesh to do?  What about the plant that promises youth and is captured by the snake?

 

  • Why so many dreams? What are they about? What do they mean?

 

  • How does one attain wisdom and maturity? What should one do to be happy?

 

 

 

Job

 

Discussion 2:

 

For these discussions, you must first post your own response to the prompt. Your responses must be complete, well thought out paragraphs. Use textual evidence (quotes from the text, with page numbers) to support your points. Then, you will be able to view the responses of your classmates. You must respond to at least two other individual’s posts to receive full credit.

 

Engage in the discussion. Feel free to ask questions, make comparisons to other texts you have read, agree or disagree with others’ points (always be civil), and flesh out ideas.

 

Prompt:

 

If worshipping God and following the rules isn’t rewarded by success in this world, why should one do so, according to the book of Job?

 

Study questions 2:

 

  • What is the purpose of the book of Job?  What message are we as readers meant to learn?

 

  • What lesson does Job learn? He doesn’t know as much as the reader does about why this happened. How does that affect what he learns as opposed to what we learn?

 

  • How does the tone of the friends’ speeches change? Are there differences in their approaches? What is their fundamental mistake when counseling Job?  What do they learn?

 

  • God is trying to teach Satan a lesson, too. How does his lesson inform ours? Is it different?

 

  • Job’s wife is the only woman in the story. She tells Job to curse God and die – basically, telling him to commit suicide in the worst way (one with eternal implications). Obviously, this is a different approach than Job’s friends.   Why do you think she told Job to do this?

 

  • What is the role of Elihu?

 

  • What do you think of the way God reveals himself to Job? Why do you think he chose it?

 

  • Analyze the conflict of faith as opposed to reason in the book of Job.  What wins?

 

  • In the end, Job’s wealth is restored, and more.  This seems like a reward for his virtue – but is it? How does the answer to that question affect the message, if at all?

 

  • Why doesn’t Job Fault God in the end?

 

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