This document is authorized for use only by KYLE MATTICE in MGT 509 Spring 2015-1 taught by Keith Yurgosky, University of Scranton from March 2015 to August 2015.

This document is authorized for use only by KYLE MATTICE in MGT 509 Spring 2015-1 taught by Keith Yurgosky, University of Scranton from March 2015 to August 2015.
For the exclusive use of K. MATTICE, 2015.
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eHarmony
The third option called for growing a new business based on eHarmony’s own research and
development efforts – particularly the long term research project aimed at understanding successful
life stage transitions. If chosen, this option would entail building a network of eHarmony-branded
sites, each focused on key life stages such as weddings, pregnancy-fertility, parenting, and elder care.
The sites would offer expert advice from eHarmony as well as support and community from other
website users who are considering similar life decisions. The sites would be free to use with most of
the revenue coming from advertising.
The final option called for rapid geographic expansion, starting with English speaking countries
and then rolling out the services to European Union nations where online dating was already very
popular. Match was present in many of these countries, suggesting that Chemistry could be rolled
out globally, too. If eHarmony did not expand to new geographies soon, it could find that its target
segments were already taken by competitors. However, some questioned whether U.S.-based
research could credibly predict matching patterns in other countries.
Despite its profitability, resources were always scarce, preventing eHarmony from making
sweeping changes. It was clear to Waldorf that the company could afford to invest in only one or two
of the options he was considering. It was less clear, however, which of them would address the shortterm competitive threats and position the company for long-term success.