Case Study Scenarios

Case Study Scenarios
Order Description
Case Study Scenarios (2500 words)
Select EITHER Option A or Option B
A. Select two (one positive/one negative) examples of student behaviour that you have observed during your professional experience (or 5-Day Observation – Primary). The examples can be of individual students, or groups of students, or the whole class.
or
B. Read the two (one positive/one negative) examples of student behaviour as outlined in the Scenarios (see below)
Using either Option A or Option B:
1. Provide a concise account of the classroom scenarios. Describe the student behaviours, what the teacher did to encourage these behaviours, and what the teacher did in response to the behaviours.
2. Discuss the developmental or contextual factors that could have contributed to the student behaviours.
3. With reference to the various behaviour management and motivational theories, explain the reasons for the behaviour of the students in each scenario and discuss how you, as a teacher, could encourage positive behaviour in the negative scenario.
Assignment 1 – Journal Tasks and Discussion Forum(s)
Using the downloadable Assignment Title Page, prepare and submit as a Word document (*.docx). Discussion Forums are completed online. Assessment results will be issued as grades. In order to achieve at least a unit pass grade ALL assessment tasks must be submitted.
Assessable Task Grading
1. Journal Tasks (flexible word limit)
Evaluate and reflect on the set readings for the unit. Responses should show increasing understanding of the concepts of stage/developmental learning theories, behavioural learning theories, models for classroom management, motivation theories and models of intelligence, and their implications and application in the classroom. Some responses will require a Biblical reflection of a learning theory. (30%)
Discussion Forum – see details in Week Three (S)
This task assesses Learning Outcomes (a), (b), (c), (d), (e)
30% Criteria N P- to P+ C to C+ D , D+ H-, H, H+
Understanding and discussion of the material, including a biblical critique as required.
15/30
Little or no understanding of material. No discrimination and choice of relevant material. No clear biblical critique exercised in the synthesis of information.
Demonstrates basic understanding of material. Some discrimination and choice of relevant material. Minimal biblical critique exercised in the synthesis of information.
Thorough understanding of material. Identification of different theological positions.
Critical analysis of source material including a strong biblical critique.
Excellent understanding of material. Capacity to evaluate conflicting theological interpretations and draw conclusions. Robust and extensive critical analysis of source material including a strong biblical critique.
Outstanding
understanding of material. Capacity to evaluate a range of conflicting theological interpretations and draw conclusions. Exceptionally lucid critical analysis of source material including a strong biblical critique.
Implications and applications of theories in the classroom. Examples of theories in action may sometimes make a difficult explanation clearer.
15/30
Demonstrates little or no understanding of implications of theories in the classroom. Few or no examples of theories in action are provided.
Demonstrates a basic understanding of implications of theories in the classroom. Several examples of theories in action are provided.
Solid understanding of implications of theories in the classroom. Many examples of theories in action are provided.
Solid and insightful understanding of implications of theories in the classroom. Many and varied examples of theories in action are provided.
Exceptionally insightful understanding of implications of theories in the classroom. Innovative examples of theories in action are provided. Discussion Forum(s): Participation and engagement on specified questions. S Irrelevant or breaching online communication guidelines. Insightful participation and engagement in the conversation on specified questions. Total 30
EDSF403: Psychology for Teachers /7
© Excelsia College
Assignment 2 – Essay and Slideshow
Assessable Task Grading
2. Essay and Slideshow (1500 words plus ppt)
You are asked to prepare a slideshow presentation for a parent-teacher meeting explaining how to support their children in their transition from primary to secondary schooling.
(a) In Essay format (1500 words) describe the relevant stage/developmental theories and models of intelligence that will underpin your presentation, including reference to any relevant biblical cognates or theological principles.
(b) Design a Powerpoint (.ppt) presentation (13-15 slides) with reference to the relevant stage/development theories and models of intelligence detailed in your essay that can be easily understood by non-academics or educators. Reference all photos, artwork or images used.
This task assesses Learning Outcomes (a), (b)
30% Criteria N P- to P+ C to C+ D , D+ H-, H, H+
Presentation and conventions e.g. spelling, grammar, sources and referencing, bibliography.
5/30
A number of spelling mistakes, grammatical inconsistencies and obvious errors. Not appropriately presented
No consultation of adequate and appropriate sources. Sources are not referenced.
Some spelling mistakes, grammatical inconsistencies and obvious errors. Legible and appropriately presented.
Some consultation of adequate and appropriate sources. All sources are referenced.
Very few spelling mistakes, grammatical inconsistencies and obvious errors. Very good presentation and attention to detail.
Wide consultation of adequate and appropriate sources. All sources are referenced.
Absence of spelling mistakes, grammatical inconsistencies and obvious errors. Excellent presentation and attention to detail.
Excellent consultation of adequate and appropriate sources, including more complex sources. All sources are referenced.
Absence of spelling mistakes, grammatical inconsistencies and obvious errors. Outstanding presentation and attention to detail.
Superior consultation of adequate and appropriate sources, including many complex sources. All sources are referenced.
Part A(Essay) -Discussion of relevant theories and models that underpin the presentation including reference to any relevant biblical or theological principles.
15/30
Demonstrates little or no understanding of theories and models. Very little discrimination and choice of relevant material. No biblical or theological principles included.
Demonstrates basic understanding of theories and models. Some discrimination and choice of relevant material. Sparse biblical or theological principles included but not explained.
Sound understanding of theories and models. Identification of biblical or theological principles included but no explained.
Extensive understanding of theories and models. Extensive and inclusive explanation of biblical or theological principles.
Superior understanding of theories and models. Insightful and distinctive explanation of biblical or theological principles.
Part B (Slideshow)- clarity, application of developmental/stage theories and models of intelligence.
10/30
Superficial presentation.
Little or no application of developmental/ stage theories and models of intelligence.
Adequate presentation.
Some application of developmental/ stage theories and models of intelligence.
Thoughtful presentation.
Consistent application of developmental/ stage theories and models of intelligence.
Thoughtful and engaging presentation.
Extensive application of developmental/ stage theories and models of intelligence.
Captivating presentation.
Extensive and creative application of developmental/ stage theories and models of intelligence. Total 30
8/ EDSF403: Psychology for Teachers
© Excelsia College
Assignment 3 – Case Study Assessable Task Grading
3. Case Study Scenarios (2500 words)
Select EITHER Option A or Option B
A. Select two (one positive/one negative) examples of student behaviour that you have observed during your professional experience (or 5-Day Observation – Primary). The examples can be of individual students, or groups of students, or the whole class.
or
B. Read the two (one positive/one negative) examples of student behaviour as outlined in the Scenarios (see below)
Using either Option A or Option B:
1. Provide a concise account of the classroom scenarios. Describe the student behaviours, what the teacher did to encourage these behaviours, and what the teacher did in response to the behaviours.
2. Discuss the developmental or contextual factors that could have contributed to the student behaviours.
3. With reference to the various behaviour management and motivational theories, explain the reasons for the behaviour of the students in each scenario and discuss how you, as a teacher, could encourage positive behaviour in the negative scenario.
This task assesses Learning Outcomes (a), (b), (c), (d), (e)
40% Criteria N P- to P+ C to C+ D , D+ H-, H, H+
Presentation and conventions e.g. spelling, grammar, sources and referencing, bibliography.
5/40
A number of spelling mistakes, grammatical inconsistencies and obvious errors. Not appropriately presented
No consultation of adequate and appropriate sources. Sources are not referenced.
Some spelling mistakes, grammatical inconsistencies and obvious errors. Legible and appropriately presented.
Some consultation of adequate and appropriate sources. All sources are referenced.
Very few spelling mistakes, grammatical inconsistencies and obvious errors. Very good presentation and attention to detail.
Wide consultation of adequate and appropriate sources. All sources are referenced.
Absence of spelling mistakes, grammatical inconsistencies and obvious errors. Excellent presentation and attention to detail.
Excellent consultation of adequate and appropriate sources, and including more complex sources. All sources are referenced.
Absence of spelling mistakes, grammatical inconsistencies and obvious errors. Outstanding presentation and attention to detail.
Superior consultation of adequate and appropriate sources, and including many complex sources. All sources are referenced.
Description of the classroom scenarios and the teacher’s response; exploration of developmental or contextual factors.
15/40
Superficial description of the classroom scenarios and the teacher’s response. Little or no exploration of developmental or contextual factors.
Adequate description of the classroom scenarios and the teacher’s response. Some exploration of developmental or contextual factors.
Detailed description of the classroom scenarios and the teacher’s response. Consistent exploration of developmental or contextual factors.
Detailed and extensive description of the classroom scenarios and the teacher’s response. Consistent and comprehensive exploration of developmental or contextual factors.
Lucid description of the classroom scenarios and the teacher’s response. Consistent, comprehensive and insightful exploration of developmental or contextual factors.
Explanation of relevant motivation and behaviour management theories and their implications for each scenario.
15/40
Little or no explanation of relevant motivation and behaviour management theories. Little or no discussion of the implications for each scenario.
Some explanation of relevant motivation and behaviour management theories. Some discussion of the implications for each scenario.
Thorough and focused explanation of relevant motivation and behaviour management theories. Detailed discussion of the implications for each scenario.
Thorough, focused and excellent explanation of relevant motivation and behaviour management theories. Incisive critique of the implications for each scenario.
Incisive and concise explanation of relevant motivation and behaviour management theories. Detailed and incisive critique of the implications for each scenario.
EDSF403: Psychology for Teachers /9
© Excelsia College
Strategies a teacher could use to encourage positive behaviour in the negative scenario.
5/40
Few strategies identified that a teacher could use to encourage positive behaviour in the negative scenario.
A restricted range of strategies given that a teacher could use to encourage positive behaviour in the negative scenario.
Adequate range of strategies given that a teacher could use to encourage positive behaviour in the negative scenario.
Wide range of strategies given that a teacher could use to encourage positive behaviour in the negative scenario.
Wide and directly applicable strategies given that a teacher could use to encourage positive behaviour in the negative scenario. Total 40
10/ EDSF403: Psychology for Teachers
© Excelsia College
Assignment 3 Support Document Option B Scenarios Class Scenario of a Negative Learning Experience
Date: 23/5/2101
Place: Peaceful Valley Christian School
Time: Period 1 Subject: PD lesson, Year 8
Context:
The teacher had explained the task to the class. The students were to prepare notes for their coming Term Examination. He told them which topics to read from their textbook. He then suggested periods of time to cover each topic. The students were to make notes that they could study from for the examination. Students were allowed to discuss their work.
Teacher: “Get on with the work”.
Neil: started talking to the boy next to him. [It didn’t look like he was talking about PD.]
10 minutes elapsed, the teacher had been moving around the room discussing people’s work with them. Then he came to Neil’s bench. Neil was now talking animatedly to the people at the bench behind him. I hadn’t seen him put pen to paper.
Teacher: “Neil, how many notes have you written?”
Neil: [sounding polite] “None sir, I am just asking them what they think of topic X.”
Teacher: “Please get on with the work”. The teacher then walked to the bench behind Neil’s to discuss their project.
Neil started talking to the boy next to him.
After 10 minutes the teacher said to the class, “You should be starting topic two now”.
Although I was an observer in the class, I went up to Neil’s desk and asked him how he was going with the work.
Neil: “I am going good sir.”
Me: “You haven’t written anything yet.”
Neil: “But I need to think about it.”
Me: Thinking to myself, ‘I am not sticking to my role as an observer. I will sit down and leave all the class directions to the teacher.’
A further 20 minutes followed and Neil either talked to the person next to him or talked to the people behind him. He did not make a mark on his exercise book. The bell went and the students were dismissed to go to their next class.
End of scenario
Class Scenario of a Positive Learning Experience – see next page
EDSF403: Psychology for Teachers /11
© Excelsia College
Assignment 3 Support Document Option B Scenarios Class Scenario of a Positive Learning Experience
Date: 25/3/2101
Place: Very Peaceful Valley Christian School
Time: Period 6 Subject: English lesson, Year 7
Context:
After a hot and humid lunch break the boys had entered the room and slumped into their chairs. The teacher had asked them to take out their Grammar books and to be ready with their pen and exercise book for work on ‘adjectives’.
Teacher: “I realize it’s hot boys and you all look red in the face from playing. We do have to get on to the work we started last lesson on …‘adjectives’… er, yes Billy?”
Billy (head on his arm on the desk): “Miss, you’ve got to be kidding, it’s awful in here and sooo hot I can’t think’
Teacher: “Yes exactly Billy. That’s why I am now saying ‘tie’s off, heads down for five minutes and cool off’… but then we will start. So run with it and we’ll survive today!”
[five minutes later]
Teacher: ‘Ok stand up stretch…… good work boys….now let’s see how we go….Amir, what word would you say is appropriate to describe how you feel at the moment?
Amir: “raging hot’
Teacher: “ Excellent Amir.. the adjective of ‘raging’ really describes it and the rest of the class will no doubt agree? ..yes, thought so – a good adjective, well done Amir’
A few boys: “sweaty!..thirsty!..exhausted!…”
Teacher: “Ok, Ok I understand!…but one at a time thank you… and let’s see what is and isn’t an adjective in those words. Now Patel, you play cricket, what adjective would you use to describe a ball that…..”
[Ten minutes later the class had a list of twenty adjectives across a range of interests and sports.]
Teacher: “Right boys, now I want you to write these adjectives into a short sentence that shows their correct use…er..Sam, please sit up…OK Sam, give me one sentence verbally that you would think you could write.”
[Sam reluctantly provided a sentence – he was I think quite a slow learner]
Teacher: “That’s terrific – and even better for a hot day Sam. Alright class let’s do this well..we all feel pretty hot so get this done and we can think about a small break before the end of the lesson”
[The students actually did it and with a few minutes to go the teacher had a few boys read theirs out. She affirmed the definition and use of ‘adjectives’ and the boys seemed grateful to have survived]
E